26Feb

Aluminum VS. Aluminium: The Etymology of the “um” and “ium” Debate

58

The soft, silvery white chemical element in the boron group with an atomic number 13 and the symbol AI has long been the cause of a word feud between the North American Countries (America and Canada) and most of the rest of the world. So, how did this aluminum or aluminium clash start? Looking back on the etymology of this word gives a clear explanation to how this spelling difference got set into place.

The Origin of Aluminum

Sir Humphry Davy, a British chemist, discovered this metal in 1808. He also discovered and named sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium, barium, and boron; lots of “ium” usage in those names, but let’s not get ahead of ourselves. Davy originally gave this element the name aluminum after the mineral alumina, whose name derive from the base alum which means “bitter salt” in Latin. This original spelling straddles the two competing versions we have today.

By 1812, when Davy published his book Chemical Philosophy he had changed the spelling to aluminum. As in the American version with one “i” and ending in “um,” aluminum. However, later that same year another anonymous scientist wrote an objection to Davy’s spelling aluminum in a British political-literacy journal, Quarterly Review. This other scientist decided that Davy’s spelling didn’t sound sufficiently Latin, and proposed the name aluminium, stating “for so we shall take the liberty of writing the word, in preference to aluminum, which has a less classical sound.” Many people, this anonymous scientist included, thought that the “ium” ending was more consistent with other elements; much like the others named by Davy.

59

The Parting of the Ways

Since 1812, the spelling has been an even mix of using the “um” and “ium” endings throughout the 19th century in both the U.S. and in Britain. Seeing as this was such a rare metal back then, it wasn’t a common household word, known mostly among scientists. As the element became more available and common, the “ium” usage was seen as more predominate across Britain and the rest of the world.

Americans however, started using Davy’s original “um” usage, which was favored by Noah Webster, the infamous dictionary master. While both spelling usage was used in America, aluminum was officially adopted in the 1920s by the American Chemical Society. It’s clear that Webster’s preferred spelling had an influence on the spelling of this word, seeing as his dictionary was a frequent consultant for journalists and professionals alike.  Britain. Seeing as this was such a rare metal back then, it wasn’t a common household word, known mostly among scientists. As the element became more available and common, the “ium” usage was seen as more predominate across Britain and the rest of the world.

Where the Aluminum Debate Stands Today

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) officially standardized on aluminium in 1990, though it hasn’t changed the way that Americans spell it for day to day purposes. Even though scientists generally use “ium” spelling, the IUPAC does recognize the “um” spelling as a variant. It seems a fair compromise.

While both the “um” and the “ium” endings are both accepted forms of spelling, the debate of “who is right” wages on. It’s clear that neither side is going to give up the way they spell this word.

Here at Premier Die Casting, we’ll stick with aluminum die casting.  But hey, we can handle aluminium too!

By Leonard Cordaro, President of Premier Die Casting Company

Source: World Wide Words

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *